Successful Golf Tournament, successful work party, and the Woodland Park Zoo’s successful efforts to sustain endangered species
Notes from the Oct. 6 meeting of
The Rotary Club of Clover Park
recorded by Tom McClellan
 
President Teresa Nye thanked Tom Faubion for serving as our meeting greeter, and Mike Killen for making sure that all of the Zoom and audio electronics were in working order.  And she thanked your loyal but not local scribe, who was only able to record these notes thanks to the Zoomography of Mike Killen and Sue Potter, who decided that she would embrace the Halloween theme early by participating in the meeting as a pirate.
 
 
Georgene Mellom stood in for Jeannie Hill as our Inspirational Momentizer, offering up a couple of quotes from America’s Cup winner Dennis Conner, including this one:
 
“It is hard to hear the music when you blow your own horn.”
 
Jim Hairston led us all in reciting the flag salute, and Sue Potter led us in reciting Rotary’s Four Way Test.  And we welcomed guests including Alan Billingsley’s wife Debbie, and Hank Kerns from the New Tacoma Cemeteries.  
 
Announcements
Jeannie Hill was absent, but had related beforehand that she had not heard of any sunshine to report.
 
Joyce Oubré and Jim Hairston thanked everyone involved in supporting the Golf Tournament, either as a volunteer or a participant (or both, in some cases).  The top score was 19 under par (out of 18 holes), which goes to show the power of the “best ball” format.  There are some raffle and performance prizes as yet undistributed, so contact Jim to collect those.  The total amount raised is still being calculated due to some outstanding invoices.  We should get that number soon.  Jim noted that we could have done even better if more golfers had been recruited, something for us all to work on next year.  
 
Teresa noted that the month of October’s Rotary theme is Economic and Community Development.  Oct. 24 is World Polio Day.  And the District 5020 nominating committee has proposed Bill McGregor as the future District Governor for the 2024-25 Rotary year. 
 
Bob Lawrence reminded everyone of the 9th Annual Lakewood Film, Arts, & Book Festival this weekend.  https://www.lakewoodfestival.org/.  And at the Lakewood Playhouse this weekend is a performance of Neil Simon’s Broadway Bound.  https://www.lakewoodplayhouse.org/
 
Alan Billingsley hosted a work party at the South Puget Sound Wildlife Area on Saturday, Oct. 2, drawing in 50 workers from other service clubs and from the community.  The City of Lakewood filmed a short video (2:16 minutes) which you can view at https://cityoflakewood.us/local-clubs-clean-up-wildlife-sanctuary/
 
 
Alan and Debbie Billingsley are hoping to start an educational after school program at the Wildlife Area for Hudtloff Middle School students starting in November, returning the site to one of the big missions it supported in the past.
 
President’s Minute
Teresa learned an expensive lesson, that even when your car has all sorts of fancy sensors, they do not always work right.  Her low tire pressure sensor failed to inform her about a flat tire, and by the time she figured it out for herself she had driven on it enough to turn the tire into mush.  That necessitated the purchase of two new rear tires (so that they would be equal in performance). 
 
Future Programs
Oct. 13    Tiffany Speir, City of Lakewood Long Term Plan
Oct. 20    Club Assembly       
Oct. 27    Jim Kopriva, Communications Director, City of Lakewood
 
Fun And Fines
Ed Trobaugh started off by reminding us of the October birthdays and anniversaries.  Please get your celebratory donations to the club in sometime during the month. 
 
Mike Killen confessed to being one of the anniversary celebrants, and also noted his recent 5-night stay in Las Vegas, rounding both up to $100.  Hey Mike, if you still have $100, then you probably did not really “do” Las Vegas.
 
David Cotant offered up what he termed a “sizable” Rat On A Rotarian (ROAR), noting that one of the members of his foursome at the Golf Tournament was a woman who was excited to meet Ed Trobaugh.  She gushed and said that she had never shaken hands with a real general before, and then insisted on getting a picture together.  David noted that Ed was quite happy to snuggle up with the woman for the picture and other frivolities. 
 
 
Ed accepted Dave’s offering of $20 for the rat, but then as the subject of the rat Ed decided not to pursue the issue further.
 
Ed then noted that Randy Black has reportedly won the 50/50 raffle at the Golf Tournament, taking half of the total pot of $420 for a prize of $210.  Ed then displayed an impressive bit of infantry math skills by calculating that a 10% tithe of that $210 would equal $21.  
 
 
This Week’s Program
We welcomed as our speaker this week Katie Remine, who is the Living Northwest Conservation Coordinator at the Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle.  Katie earned a bachelor’s degree in Biology and a minor in African Studies at Colorado College, and completed her Master of Science degree in Biodiversity Conservation and Management at Imperial College of London.  She coordinates the Zoo’s involvement in wildlife conservation, including projects to recover local endangered species, and projects to help communities coexist with local wildlife, from carnivores to pollinators. 
 
 
Among the carnivores that they are tracking are wolverines, lynx, and martens.  Part of her job is to train volunteers to install, maintain, and gather pictures from camera traps.
 
 
You can see some of the photos from these cameras at www.carnivorespotter.org.  
 
There are 10 different species of bats in western Washington, and they monitor the bats’ nighttime activities with acoustic sensors which can differentiate among the different species.
 
Katie spoke a little bit about the western pond turtle restoration project at our adopted South Puget Sound Wildlife area, a project that the Zoo has undertaken for the past 30 year.  Turtles are reared at the zoo for a year before being released, allowing them to get big enough to evade invasive bullfrogs.  The turtles are being monitored at 6 different sites, including at wetlands along the Columbia Gorge. 
 
She mentioned the Draft Management Plan for the wildlife area that has been assembled by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.  You can view that plan at https://wdfw.wa.gov/places-to-go/wildlife-areas/south-puget-sound-wildlife-area
 
A similar headstarting program is also underway for the Oregon silverspot butterfly, which used to be prolific in our area too despite the “Oregon” tag in its name. 
 
Katie was happy to learn about Alan and Debbie Billingsley’s plans to start an educational program for middle schoolers at the Wildlife Area, and offered to provide some curriculum materials to support that.  And she welcomes questions from members at Katie.Remine@zoo.org.
 
This Week’s Raffle
With $291 in the pot, 23 cards in the deck including 1 ace, Georgene Mellom had the winning ticket, but drew a queen for just $5.  23-1 odds are pretty hard to beat.
 
 
And Finally…
Your faithful scribe is monitoring and reporting on Club activities from a “secure, undisclosed location,” which apparently is a pretty low crime area.  Here is one of the greater crimes deemed worthy of reporting in the local paper there:
 
 
"It wasn't me, shooting Nerf balls, it was some other guy I saw, I swear.  And all of this Nerf stuff is not mine, I'm just holding onto it for a friend."